Vasculitis

Vasculitis

Vasculitis means  inflammation of the blood vessels, arteries, veins or capillaries. When such inflammation occurs, it causes changes in the walls of blood vessels, such as weakening and narrowing that can progress to the point of blood vessel blockage.

A result of vasculitis is that the tissues and organs supplied by affected blood vessels do not get enough blood. This can cause organ and tissue damage that can even lead to death.

Vasculitis is a family of rare diseases that can affect people of all ages. Though some forms of vasculitis improve on their own, most require treatment. The length of treatment varies, with some people using medications for extended periods of time.

The different types of vasculitis are classified according to the size and location of the blood vessels that are affected.


What Is Vasculitis?

Vasculitis (vas-kyu-LI-tis) is a condition that involves inflammation in the blood vessels. The condition occurs if your immune system attacks your blood vessels by mistake. This may happen as the result of an infection, a medicine, or another disease or condition.

“Inflammation” refers to the body’s response to injury, including injury to the blood vessels. Inflammation may involve pain, redness, warmth, swelling, and loss of function in the affected tissues.

In vasculitis, inflammation can lead to serious problems. Complications depend on which blood vessels, organs, or other body systems are affected.

Overview

Vasculitis can affect any of the body’s blood vessels. These include arteries, veins, and capillaries. Arteries carry blood from your heart to your body’s organs. Veins carry blood from your organs and limbs back to your heart. Capillaries connect the small arteries and veins.

If a blood vessel is inflamed, it can narrow or close off. This limits or prevents blood flow through the vessel. Rarely, the blood vessel will stretch and weaken, causing it to bulge. This bulge is known as an aneurysm (AN-u-rism).

 

Vasculitis

Figure A shows a normal artery with normal blood flow. The inset image shows a cross-section of the normal artery. Figure B shows an inflamed, narrowed artery with decreased blood flow. The inset image shows a cross-section of the inflamed artery. Figure C shows an inflamed, blocked (occluded) artery and scarring on the artery wall. The inset image shows a cross-section of the blocked artery. Figure D shows an artery with an aneurysm. The inset image shows a cross-section of the artery with an aneurysm.

The disruption in blood flow caused by inflammation can damage the body’s organs. Signs and symptoms depend on which organs have been damaged and the extent of the damage.

Typical symptoms of inflammation, such as fever and general aches and pains, are common among people who have vasculitis.

Outlook

There are many types of vasculitis, but overall the condition is rare. If you have vasculitis, the outlook depends on:

The type of vasculitis you have
Which organs are affected
How quickly the condition worsens
The severity of the condition
Treatment often works well if it’s started early. In some cases, vasculitis may go into remission. “Remission” means the condition isn’t active, but it can come back, or “flare,” at any time.

Sometimes vasculitis is chronic (ongoing) and never goes into remission. Long-term treatment with medicines often can control the signs and symptoms of chronic vasculitis.

Rarely, vasculitis doesn’t respond well to treatment. This can lead to disability and even death.

Much is still unknown about vasculitis. However, researchers continue to learn more about the condition and its various types, causes, and treatments.

Source:  National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, What Is Vasculitis?  April 1, 2011

Click here to download the Vasculitis brochure.

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Participation in Clinical Trials is one way you can help advance research into finding better treatments and perhaps even a cure for vasculitis!
Learn how you can participate in clinical trials - National Institutes of Health

Vasculitis Foundation Fellowship Program

The Vasculitis Foundation Fellowship provides the opportunity for one- or two- year tracks designed to support the training of physician scientists who wish to gain clinical expertise in vasculitis and who may also wish to pursue an investigational career in this field. The fellowship will be conducted through Vasculitis Centers where there has been a track record of training individuals in vasculitis.

"The Vasculitis Foundation is committed to creating greater awareness and interest in vasculitis," said Joyce Kullman, executive director of the VF. "We hope that our new Vasculitis Foundation Fellowship will encourage medical professionals to pursue careers in patient care and research linked to vasculitis."

The Vasculitis Foundation Fellowship is possible thanks to the generous support of Genentech, Inc., and Biogen Idec and many other generous individual and corporate donors. For more information on how you may donate to the Vasculitis Foundation Fellowship, visit the donate page.

Medical Institutions

The Vasculitis Foundation encourages vasculitis patients to seek expert medical care for diagnosis and treatment of the disease. The VF works closely with vasculitis experts and centers around the world to ensure patients have access to the most up-to-date medical care.

The Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium (VCRC) is an integrated group of academic medical centers, patient support organizations, and clinical research resources dedicated to conducting clinical research in different forms of vasculitis and improving the care of patients with vasculitis.